Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Italian bishop turns heads with Giorgio Armani vestments

Just found this article at the Guardian this morning while drinking my morning tea. This is not re-posted by me in a sarcastic frame of mind, I actually think the vestments are quite beautiful. I just wish the bishop (whom the Guardian describes as a 'free thinker' within the Church) would lose that silly hat. Interestingly, the good bishop penned the preface to a book examing the financial scandals in the Vatican, which was published on the eve of the beatification of JPII. I found the article by following links at the blog site Pray Tell, while reading an article on the latest (Swiss) Catholic bishop to speak out in favor of women's ordination. While purusing the comments sections of the article, I came across a 'compliment' for fellow blogger William Lindsey and his superb blog Bilgrimage. At least I think it was a comment, since it referred to Bilgrimage as "a quite uncomfortable site." I presume the commenter meant that Bilgrimage exposes unpalatable truths about the Catholic Church which more orthodox church goers would rather not hear.  And I was led to Pray Tell by Bridget Mary's Blog, which never fails in keeping us alert to all the signs of the impending revolution in the Patriarchal Church. All things are connected. From women priests to quite uncomfortable sites to the silken green vestments of Georgio Armani. I can't help wonder if the good bishop below isn't a "friend of Dorothy,' since who else but a gay queen would appreciate such beauty and delight in parading about in it.

Follow the link for a much closer look at the green silk vestments:



The devil may wear Prada, but a Sicilian bishop has set out to show Satan does not have a stranglehold on designer clothing by ordering new vestments from Giorgio Armani.

Bishop Domenico Mogavero drew compliments from churchgoers when he turned out for mass on Monday on the Mediterranean island of Pantelleria in green silk vestments designed by Armani and decorated with symbols of vines, wheat, shells and starfish.

Mogavero said the vestments had turned heads, particularly among female parishioners, but warned he had no intention of turning the aisle into a catwalk.

"This is all not about having brands in church or indulging in the fashion of the moment, but about wearing something beautiful to give glory to God," said Mogavero, 64, who donned the vestments at a ceremony for the opening of a church on the tiny volcanic island.

Armani, who has holidayed on Pantelleria for 37 years and owns a luxury retreat there, has created four vestments for the new church, in green, white, red and purple.

"They are tasteful, made from a sober type of silk and give an idea of the solemnity of the occasion," said Mogavero, who was appointed the bishop of Mazara del Vallo, in Sicily, four years ago.

Known as a free thinker within the church, Mogavero once called for Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi to resign over his sex scandals and has told Italians to show more tolerance towards immigrants.

Most recently he penned the preface to a book that details the financial scandals at the Vatican during John Paul II's papacy and was published on the eve of the Polish pontiff's beatification.

Last summer he approached Armani, 76, about vestments for the church on Pantelleria, which is closer to Tunisia than the Italian mainland.

"I asked him for the vestments as a gift to the new church – to create something beautiful, original and with themes reflecting the island," he said. "I will see him this summer and I'll have the opportunity to thank him personally."

Mogavero's venture into designer wear follows reports that Pope Benedict had a weakness for red Prada shoes, although the Vatican daily L'Osservatore Romano scotched the rumours, pointing out that the shoes in question were in fact made by an Italian artisan. "The Pope is not dressed by Prada but by Christ," the newspaper stated.

2 comments:

Sage said...

Absolutely Fabulous!

Jayden Cameron said...

It is, isn't it? Or they are, aren't they?